HEALTH NOTES: Eye doctor will see you now… at the optician’s

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HEALTH NOTES: Eye doctor will see you now… at the optician’s

High street opticians are consulting eye doctors by video link in order to diagnose customers’ sight-threatening conditions.

The video calls, which link stores with specialists miles away, could speed up emergency treatment and save thousands of hospital trips.

Developed by the University of Strathclyde and NHS Forth Valley, the system gives opticians quick access to an expert opinion on eye injuries – such as glass in the eye.

High street opticians are consulting eye doctors by video link in order to diagnose customers¿ sight-threatening conditions. The video calls could speed up emergency treatment and save thousands of hospital trips (stock image)

High street opticians are consulting eye doctors by video link in order to diagnose customers’ sight-threatening conditions. The video calls could speed up emergency treatment and save thousands of hospital trips (stock image)

In the video calls, the specialist watches a magnified view of the patient’s eye and suggests treatment. 

Half of all customers who have the video consultation do not need a second appointment.

The system is available in Scottish high-street opticians and health clinics and could soon be rolled out across the country.

Two-thirds of Britons stop for a junk-food fix while driving, and a quarter of young drivers enjoy a full fast-food meal, according to a new survey

Two-thirds of Britons stop for a junk-food fix while driving, and a quarter of young drivers enjoy a full fast-food meal, according to a new survey

ALSO READ :  Many eco-friendly takeout bowls contain dangerous chemicals linked to cancer and infertility

We all love a snack on a long drive, but treats sold at service stations are making us fat.

Two-thirds of Britons stop for a junk-food fix while driving, and a quarter of young drivers enjoy a full fast-food meal, according to a new survey.

Over half of drivers admitted to eating ‘less healthily’ than they do at home, in a poll of 2,000 adults by car manufacturer SEAT.

Research shows that regularly consuming high-calorie snacks increases the risk of obesity and related illnesses such as heart disease and type 2 diabetes.

More than 30 million Britons stop at service stations every year, spending an average of £2.90 each.

PECS APPEAL WOWS WOMEN  

Broad-chested men are more desirable to the opposite sex, new research suggests. 

Scientists at Bucknell University in the US asked 122 women to examine more than 100 men with varying chest-to-waist ratios. 

The women then rated each man on traits such as attractiveness, health, masculinity, friendliness, parent potential, intelligence and fitness. 

On average, men with a chest 70 per cent larger than their waist were given the highest ratings. 

Researchers suggest a large chest could indicate higher levels of the male hormone testosterone.



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