Chocolate chip cookies recalled nationwide after customers found bits of blue plastic

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Chocolate chip cookies recalled nationwide after customers found bits of blue plastic in their treats

  • Entenmann’s Little Bites Soft Baked Cookies are sold in batches of 30 mini cookies
  • The were pulled from shelves across the US on Thursday

Cookies sold in 37 states and Washington, DC have been recalled after customers found bits of blue plastic lodged in their treats.

Entenmann’s Little Bites Soft Baked Cookies, sold in batches of 30 mini cookies, were pulled from shelves across the US on Thursday. 

No injuries have been reported, but health officials warn customers to avoid the ‘5-pack Mini Chocolate Chip variety’ due to the choking risk, particularly for children.

Bimbo Bakeries USA Inc, the manufacturing plant based in Pennsylvania, said in a statement: ‘We received a small number of consumer reports, took immediate action to investigate and have corrected the manufacturing issue.’

This year alone, there have been a dozen or so recalls of food containing inedible materials

This year alone, there have been a dozen or so recalls of food containing inedible materials

Customers should look out for the UPC code: 7203002378. 

If they have bought one of these boxes, return them or call 800-984-0989.

It is hardly a rare occurrence. This year alone, there have been a dozen or so recalls of food containing inedible materials.

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In June, Tyson recalls 95 tons of chicken fritters in 29 states after three schools found ‘clear plastic and soft gray plastic’ in them.

In May, top health food brand Purely Elizabeth was forced to recall its granola after a customer found rock, glass and plastic in their breakfast.

That same week, Vienna Beef recalled 2,000 pounds of frankfurters for containing ‘metal pieces’. 

Metal, plastic and rock aren’t the only things finding their way into our ingredients and onto our plates. 

Recalls of food contaminated with E. coli, Salmonella, Listeria and other bacteria are also on the rise.

In fact, the rate of recalls issued by the FDA has more than doubled, from 56 in 2013 to 145 in 2017 – with plenty of voluntary recalls from companies, too. 

The issue is partly to do with speedier production lines: technology has risen to the challenge to meet soaring demand for processed food, but the improvements were lopsided. 

Conveyor belts may move faster, but screening techniques to spot lurking contaminants do not – and, incidentally, speeding up machines raises the risk that they will wear down, and bits will break off.  



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