Studies Confirm Irritable Girlfriends Make Men Healthier, So It’s Time to Show Your Fierce Side

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Complaining about your girlfriend’s bad temperament or your partner’s constant nagging for you to stop being so “irritating” may no longer be a cause for concern. That’s because a study has revealed that women with strong personalities should be considered real gems by their lucky partners. According to this research, these girlfriends might actually lessen the risk of developing health conditions such as diabetes in their partners.

Bright Side is eager to share with you all the details of this study and other complementary research that has changed the perception of what an ideal relationship should look like.

The benefits of being in a bad mood

The negative consequences of having a strong personality are debatable, but it certainly has its benefits. This is precisely what a study conducted by specialists from Michigan State University and the University of Chicago revealed. They analyzed if having a bad temper could have an impact on the health conditions of people’s relationships, focusing on the potential to develop diabetes.

What to take into account

A total of 1,228 people and their partners engaged in the study. The couples were asked about the levels of satisfaction they felt in their relationship, how happy they were with their partner, and if they spent their free time together. They also answered questions about the amount of trust and openness they had with each other, as well as demands and criticism they felt their partners directed at them.

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Results differed from men to women.

The quality of the relationship varied depending on the gender of the participants. Women who reported a more positive environment had a reduced risk of developing diabetes in the future. The scientists behind the study explain that this happens because they’re more conscious of the way they interact with their partners which has a significant effect on their metabolic health.

Control is key.

Findings regarding men, however, surprised the researches since they were actually opposite of those of women. Men that reported being in a relationship with women who liked having constant control and who criticized them or made numerous demands showed a lower probability of developing diabetes later in life.

Regulated behavior

These men not only have a lower risk of developing diabetes, but they also improve their chances of controlling levels of sugar after diabetes appears. Scientists stressed the fact that this wasn’t the result of an intense and conflicted relationship, but rather, the result of a person’s effort to keep track of their partner’s health, which translated into criticism or demands.

A sign of intelligence

Women who have a bad temper usually make better decisions because according to a study conducted by the School of Psychology of the University of South Wales, they’re smarter. The thing is, they’re much more skeptical, which leads them to make more objective and analyzed decisions. Plus, they know how to articulate a message more persuasively and effectively. Maybe that’s why their partners pay more attention to them and end up having better health as a result.

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The dark side of having a bad temper

A woman with a strong personality may have some advantages when she’s trying to make a decision. However, according to research done by Juan Manuel Romero Villa, author of He Who Gets Mad, Gets Fat, people who are usually in a bad mood tend to put on the pounds. This happens because their bodies release adrenaline and cortisol which cause inflammation and, as a result, are unable to release energy which makes them gain weight.

What other negative or positive attitudes do you believe people with strong characters have? Share your thoughts in the comment section!





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